Newark Public Schools Teacher Finalist in Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics

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Denise Rawding will represent New Jersey nationally as a finalist for the 2016 Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching

[Newark, NJ – October 19, 2016] Newark Public Schools (NPS) teacher Denise Rawding has been selected as one of five New Jersey finalists in math for the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching (PAEMST). Rawding, a current math coach at Dr. William Horton School of Arts and Technology and former teacher at 1st Ave School, will represent the state as a finalist.

“Denise Rawding is an inspiration to her peers and the success of her students in the classroom speaks to her skills as an educator,” said Superintendent Christopher D. Cerf of NPS. “Newark Public Schools is fortunate to have talented teachers like Denise working hard to provide an excellent education for our children each and every day. On behalf of the district, I would like to congratulate Denise on this well-deserved recognition of being selected as a finalist for the 2016 Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching.”

The PAEMST are the highest honors a teacher can receive from the United States government. The PAEMST program recognizes teachers who are seen as role models in their communities and leaders in the improvement of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education.

Established in 1983, the PAEMST program authorizes the president to present over 100 awards each year to deserving educators. The program is overseen by the National Science Foundation on behalf of The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Awards are given to mathematics and science teachers from across the country as well as in the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Department of Defense Education Activity schools, or the U.S. territories.

Winners receive a signed certificate by the President of the United States, a paid trip to Washington, DC to attend related events and a $10,000 award from the National Science Foundation.