District History

  • 1676 – “School master and accommodations for a school in the township”
  • 1700 – Probable that the 1st school house was erected…on or near sight of stone school house on Market Street…” (Rept. of Super. 1855) (between Halsey and Broad)
  • 1740 – Aaron Burr (Rev.) established his Latin school.
  • 1747 – College of New Jersey (Princeton) moved to Newark from Elizabeth town. In fall of the same year when it was opened.
  • 1748 – First commencements of College of New Jersey (Princeton) held at 1st Presbyterian Church (6 graduates).
  • 1768 – Second grammar school established by William Hasson.
  • 1769 – Origin of Newark public school system. On March 14, the town records show an appropriation of money for the free education of the poor.
  • 1774 – “…a schoolhouse may be built on nay of the common land in Newark…” town records. “…the poor children shall be constantly sent to school, at the expense of the person who takes them.” 1st Newark Academy erected.
  • 1784 – First School in Newark, Chancellor Ave. (Elizabeth & Chancellor Avenue),(1784-1930).
  • 1792 – Newark Academy relocated at corner of Broad and Academy Street. After being burned by British raiding party in 1790.
  • 1794 – First night school in U.S. and 1st free school in Newark opened by Moses Combs. 3 R’s composed the curriculum. Many adults also attended classes.
  • 1797 – White school erected at Washington, Spruce and Clinton Avenue (Private) “…place under the jurisdiction of Trustees selected by the town meeting.” First Annual Report of the Board of Education, 1857.
  • 1804 – Market Street School erected, became Boy’s Lodging House (Private)
  • 1809 – Union school built on New Street (Private) “Demolish last summer” 1st Annual, 1857 p.5.
  • 1813-14 –  Free school, poor school or Charity school was established and “…place under the jurisdiction of Trustees selected by the town meeting.” First Annual Report of the Board of Education, 1857.
  • 1813-14 – On April 12, the town meeting appropriated money for public education ($500). This was a precedent followed annually although the towns of New Jersey at that time had no legal authority to levy taxes for educational purposes.
  • 1819 – Town committee was “instructed to fix up and prepare a room in the upper part of Market Street for the use of the Free School at the town expense.”
  • 1822 – Female Union school Harrison Street established and “partially sustained by public money”, began giving money in 1824. In 1848 became Protestant Foster Home. Female Department of West Ward public school was connected with this when it opened in 1838.
  • 1825 – “…committee of the Male Free school…are…instructed to introduce the Lancastrian system of teaching in the school, if practicable under existing circumstances.”
  • 1826 – Male Free school was changed “…from a free to pay school and on the Lancastrian plan.
  • 1828 – New Jersey made available “…portion of the income of the State school funds among the several townships of the State.” Town appropriated $100 “For the poor colored children’s instruction in the township.”
  • 1829 – First state aid in support of public education received from the State of New Jersey (4291.48). School committee was instructed to report annually to the town meeting”…of the different free schools in the township”. $1,000 appropriation was voted for the free schools.
  • 1830 – Town received a $5,000 request from the estate of Thomas Longworth, the income from which, beginning in 1831, became a part of the funds for public education.
  • 1836 – Original Charter of the City of Newark provided for the annual election of a school committee. A public school as established in each of the 4 wards. Each had a male and female department. (Newark High School)
  • 1838 – First high school – for boys – located on 2nd floor of the schoolhouse of Bank Street. Nathan Hedges, first principal. (Third to be established in U.S). Establishment of a public school in each of the 4 wards:
    • NorthWard: Washington School, Orange Street
    • EastWard: Church on Market Street (basement) near New Jersey Railroad Depot
    • SouthWard: Methodist Episcopal Church (basement) on Franklin Street
    • WestWard: Male Department 1st story of Nathan Hedges Schoolhouse on Bank Street. Female Department: Female Union School on Harrison Street
  • 1844 – First school building erected in Newark with public money. It was located on part of a lot bounded by Court, Hill, Halsey and Broad Streets. It was named the Third Ward School. Up to this time, free public education had been carried on in rented buildings.
  • 1847 – State Street School erected. Building occupied by the State Street Binet School. Enlarged 1887. It is the oldest school in use in the city of Newark. Franklin Institute established by Professor J.J. Mapes, father of Mary Mapes Dodge, 1883, located between Plane and High Schools.
  • 1848-49 – Lafayette Street School – oldest school in Newark.
  • 1849 – Wickliffe Street School erected (called Boys’ Industrial).
  • 1850 – State Legislature passed “an act to establish public schools in the City of Newark” increasing local authority for the development of education. Two elected from each ward “…shall constitute a Board of Education of the City of Newark.”
  • 1851 – Original Morton Street School erected (called Sixth Ward School) enlarged 1861-9, 1881, 1898, 1909. First Board of Education set up. Samuel H. Pennington, President; Frederick W. Richard, Secretary.
  • 1852 – Approximate date of the establishment of the first public colored school in Newark, located in the basement of the African Presbyterian Church on Place Street. Purchased lot on Washington Street and Linden Street for $5,000. Building cost $20,000.
  • 1854 – “… the Board of Education assumed the control and provided for the expense of the educational department of 2 Industrial Schools in the city of Newark” “…object of the Industrial School is to afford the opportunity of moral and intellectual education to the children of want and destitution…to a large class, ever increasing in large cities, who rarely present themselves voluntarily for admission to the public school.” Girls’ Industrial enlarged 1887.
  • 1854 – Sixteen public schools in Newark entirely supported by public expense.
    • 7 district schools for boys, 5-18 years of age
    • 7 district schools for girls
    • 1 primary school for girls and boys
    • 1 school for colored children
  • 1855 – The first separate high school building in Newark opened at Washington and Linden Streets on the site of the Essex Market. Torn down 1931; Essex Market built on site. Dedicated January 4, 1855; opened January 8: 192 males and 190 females. The addition of the first special subject, vocal music, also was made in 1855. First city evening school established in Newark. Saturday Normal School opened, in high school building in April following the dedication of the school. First Principal of the high school, salary $1,000 per year. Dr. Stephen Congar, became first superintendent of schools.
  • 1856 – January 4th – First annual report of the city superintendent presented to the Board of Education. It was 32-pages long, printed at the Office of the Daily Advertiser, grandfather of the Star Eagle. Superintendent Congar reported that during 1855, the first year of his administration, the number of public school classes had nearly doubled. Congar was a physician and did not devote his entire time to education. His salary was $400 a year, while that of Mr. Peckham, principal of the high school was $1,000. Boys’ Continuation School erected, as was present Webster Street School. (8th Ward) South Market, and PS #9 corner of Market and Mott Streets. Public schools increased from 6 to 30. Primary industrial School #3 was organized in rooms rented on Kinney Street near Broad. Newark Academy demolished to make way for Post Office. Webster Street School enlarged 1910-1913.
  • 1857 – The charter of the city of Newark included. “…provision for elected Board of Education” 1st annual report of the Board of Education…prepared by the city superintendent of public schools. Newark Academy relocated to High, William & Shipman Street, in building known as Wesleyan Institute.
  • 1859 – Stephen Congar, succeeded by George B. Sears as superintendent of schools.
  • 1860 – Chestnut Street School building erected: enlarged 1870; 1900.
  • 1861 – Co-education began in the primary grades. Introduced to reduce costs of separate education for males and females.
  • 1862 – Walnut Street School erected; enlarged 1877 (10th Ward).
  • 1867 – Newton Street School erected; enlarged 1868, 1871, 1873, 1900, 1904, and 1913.
  • 1868 – Orange Street School house deeded to the city by its trustees. Washington Street School erected; enlarged 1904.
  • 1869 – Burnet Street School erected; enlarged 1960-7-10. Oliver Street School erected. When Charles Evans Hughes entered this school in 1871, it had 14 classrooms. He was graduated from there at 11 years of age and entered Newark High School in 1872. The Hughes family lived at 164 Elm Street. Elizabeth Avenue School erected; enlarged 1895.
  • 1870 – George B. Sears, City Superintendent of Public Schools.
  • 1870 – South 10th Street School erected; enlarged 1879, 1888, and 1896.
  • 1871 – Eighteenth Avenue School erected; was called Milford when built; enlarged 1900.
  • 1872 – Central Avenue School erected; enlarged 1903-13.
  • 1873 – Lawrence Street School erected; enlarged 1896. South 8th Street School erected; enlarged 1900-1906-1907.
  • 1877 – George B. Sears succeeded by William N. Barringer as city superintendent of schools. Sears was Vice-Principal of the high school in 1856.
  • 1878 – Market Street School – 1-year course – two-year course.
  • 1879 – First drawing teacher for the public schools (Sara A. Fawcett) as appointed.
  • 1881 – Miller Street School erected; enlarged 1887, 188-1900, 1913.
  • 1881 – Hamburg Place School erected; enlarged 1885, 1886, 1900, and 1906.
  • 1882 – Wilson Avenue School erected. Art School.
  • 1882 – Sara A. Fawcett Drawing School established with 2 classes in small rooms in the Commerce Street building.
  • 1883 – Newark’s first high school building erected in 1855 at Washington and Linden Street. Roseville Avenue School.
  • 1884 – Summer Avenue School erected; enlarged 1897.
  • 1884 – Roseville Avenue School erected; enlarged 1903.
  • 1884 – South Street School erected; enlarged 1900.
  • 1884 – Camden Street School erected; enlarged 1900.
  • 1885 – First summer schools in the United States opened in Newark upon the recommendation of Superintendent Barringer. First Evening School.
  • 1886 – July 12, Summer School or Vacation – 22 classes – enrollment 1400. First vacation schools on Western Continent.
  • 1887 – Monmouth Street School erected; enlarged 1896.
  • 1888 – 16th Street School erected. (1887-1888).
  • 1888 – Hawkins Street School erected; enlarged 1904.
  • 1888 – Robert Treat School erected (as an elementary school) called 18th Avenue.
  • 1889 – Franklin School erected; enlarged 1895, 1903, 1906. 1907.
  • 1892 – Waverly Avenue School erected; enlarged 1909.
  • 1892 – Ann Street School erected.
  • 1892 – Warren Street School erected; enlarged 1908.
  • 1893 – Sept. 1, Kindergarten started in South Market Street School.
  • 1894 – Garfield School erected (1893-1894); enlarged 1897-1914.
  • 1895 – Charlton Street School erected; enlarged 1899-1903.
  • 1895 – 15th Avenue School erected; enlarged 1907.
  • 1896 – Drawing school on Academy opened as a formal school unit – Sara A. Fawcett Drawing Academy – 3 story building.
  • 1896 – William N. Barringer succeeded by Charles B. Gilbert as city Superintendent of Schools.
  • 1897 – Hawthorne Avenue School erected; enlarged 1900, 1908, 1914.
  • 1897 – Sara A. Fawcett School of Industrial Arts erected by Dr. E. Ill on property he owned. Academy Street ungraded in same building as Industrial Arts.
  • 1898 – April 4, Undgraded
  • 1899 – Barringer High School building opened under the name Newark High School. (It was the only high school in the city). Wayland E. Stearns was principal. He was assisted by Miss Greene, who was vice principal and head of the English Department (cost $300,000 site called “Goat Hill.”
  • 1900 – Abington Avenue School erected; enlarged 1906-07 & 13 were originally named Alexander Archibald School.
  • 1900 – Bergen Street School erected; enlarged 1903-08.
  • 1900 – Sussex Avenue School erected; enlarged 1904; enlarged 1955.
  • 1900 – Commerce Street Ungraded School erected.
  • 1901 – Addison B. Poland succeeded Charles B. Gilbert as superintendent of schools.
  • 1902 – Dayton Street School erected on Dayton Street near Ludlow Street. Original building was 2 rooms and was purchased from Clinton Township. First meeting of Newark Schoolmen’s Club. Open Air School opened on Chancellor Avenue corner of Elizabeth Avenue; purchased from Clinton Township.
  • 1903 – Summer Place School erected. Roseville Avenue School enlarged.
  • 1905 – Madison School erected (elementary); enlarged 1910.
  • 1905 – Alexander Street School erected; annexed from Vailsburg.
  • 1905 – Elliott Street School addition erected.
  • 1907 – “In accordance with the provisions contained in Chapter VI, Section 39 of the Revised School Law, a resolution was adopted by the common council August 2, 1907 directing a referendum at the next general election thereafter, on the question of substituting a board of 9, to be appointed by the mayor, for the board consisting of 32 members elected by wards.” 51st Annual Report of the Board of Education 1907.
  • 1908 – “By vote of the people at the election held on November 5, 1907, the control of the public school system of Newark was vested in a Board of 9 members to be appointed by the mayor; and the elective Board of 30 members, 2 from each ward, was abolished, dating from January 1, 1908.
  • 1908 – Lincoln School erected.
  • 1908 – Newark High School named changed to Barringer High School in honor of Dr. William Barringer, former superintendent of school.
  • 1909 – Segregation was eliminated with the closing of the “colored school” on Market Street. James M. Baxter, principal of the colored school, died December 28. He had retired July 1. The school had been discontinued by board action July 29. Sept. 10, School nurse first employed.
  • 1910 – Hanover Street Ungraded School erected.
  • 1910 – Woodland Avenue Ungraded School erected. (Ungraded School #1).
  • 1910 – Nov 2, School for the Deaf (Chestnut Street); Nov. 16, Washington Sch for Blind. Oct. 1, Binet (Defective) School.
  • 1911 – East Side High School located on Van Buren and Warwick opened, with Thomas F. Kennedy as principal. This was Newark’s second high school.
  • 1911 – Montgomery Street School opened.
  • 1911 – Ridge Street School opened.
  • 1911 – Peshine Avenue School opened as Berkeley School.
  • 1911 – South 17th Street School opened.
  • 1911 – Newark Parental School in Verona opened.
  • 1911 – School for Feeble Minded (College Place) opened.
  • 1911 – School for Blind (Washington Street) opened.
  • 1911 – Ungraded #1 (South 10th Street) opened.
  • 1911 – Feb. 1, Open Air (Elizabeth Avenue) opened.
  • 1911 – Ungraded #2 (Chestnut) erected.
  • 1911 – Classes for foreigners begin in 9 schools.
  • 1912 – January, Central High School opened with William Wiener as principal. Cephas I. Shirley appointed first business manager.
  • 1912 – Cleveland School opened.
  • 1912 – Sara A. Fawcett Drawing School re-named Fawcett School of Industrial Arts.
  • 1912 – June 1, All-Year Schools-established.
  • 1912 – First “all year” school established at “…Belmont Avenue and 7th Avenue Schools…experiment”.
  • 1913 – Newark’s first high school building (corner Linden and Washington Streets) became Girls’ Vocational School when Newark Normal School (in building High School opened, Johnson Avenue and Alpine Street. Coe’s Place School opened.
  • 1914 – School for Defectives (Alyea) opened.
  • 1914 – Girls Voc established Sept. 1.
  • 1914 – Feb., First State Normal School class.
  • 1915 –  McKinley (8th Avenue) opened.
  • 1915 –  Summer high school for 1st time (Barringer and Central).
  • 1915 –  Central High enlarged. (Boys Voc. established July 1.)
  • 1916 – “…by 1916 he (the mayor) had the power to appoint without consent of the council…the Board of Education…” Safety Patrols organized in Newark school system on May 24, 1916. Authority given to Superintendent Poland at Board Meeting. Sept. 1, Speech Improvement. April, School Clinic.
  • 1917 – Junior high school established in 3 grade schools: Madison, Robert Treat and Cleveland. Speedway Avenue School opened. School safety patrol organized under police department. David B. Corson succeeded Dr. Poland as Superintendent of Schools. Addison B. Poland retained title of superintendent emeritus.
  • 1918 – David B. Carson appointed Superintendent.
  • 1918 – Speech improvement classes established at four centers. Robert Treat, Lafayette, Belmont, Moses Bigelow (now 15th Avenue School), Coe’s Place Binet #2 opened.
  • 1918 – Junior College established, August 29th South Side High School.
  • 1918 – February 1, Psychologist-Child Guidance.
  • 1921 – Jan. 3, Belmont Avenue School for Crippled.
  • 1922 – Junior college abolished on July 1st. April 1, Building Trades School
  • 1924 – Maple Avenue School opened.
  • 1924 – Arlington ungraded school opened (also said to have opened in 1925).
  • 1924 – Sight conservation classes established in 18th Avenue and Webster Schools.
  • 1924 – January 21, Nutrition Classes.
  • 1925 – May 4, Branch Brook School (crippled) opened on Ridge Street.
  • 1925 – September 1, Accredited Evening High School, “meeting all state standards for day high school, came into being in Barringer High School building…”. Essex Co took over Boys Voc. and Girls Voc.
  • 1926 – September, West Side High School opened with Alan Johnson as principal.
  • 1927 – Board of Education building (City Hall Annex) completed. John J. Logan succeeded David B. Corson, as Superintendent of Schools.
  • 1928 – Bragaw Avenue School opened. August 7, Board of Education Building.
  • 1928 – First Avenue School opened.
  • 1928 – Fawcett School of Industrial Arts re-named Newark Public School of Fine & Industrial Arts.
  • 1929 – Boylan Street School opened. Sept., Barringer Evening High.
  • 1930 – Woodland Avenue Adjustment School opened (formerly So. 10th Street graded). Sept. 1, Open Air transferred to Boylan Street School.
  • 1931 – Newark Public School of Fine and Industrial Arts reopened, with Raymond P. Ensign as principal; High and William Streets.
  • 1931 -Chancellor Avenue School opened. Ivy Street School opened.
  • 1931 – September 1, Washington St. for Blind transferred to Robert Treat.
  • 1931 – “All-year” schools discontinued “…Reason? economy measure.”
  • 1931 – Washington Street School abandoned. (Rented to city for $1 per year to be used as a lodging house)
  • 1931 – Montgomery Street Binet opened.
  • 1932 – Organization: 2,140-day schoolteachers; 54 principals; 10 head teachers. 9-member Board of Education appointed by mayor with 5 standing committees.
    1. Secretary of Board with staff of 1 assistant, 7 clerks and 2 stenographers. Counsel, business manager, superintendent of supplies and superintendent of instruction.
    2. Superintendent has 1 first assistant and 4 assistant superintendents.
    3. Board of examiners has 8 members including the superintendent and first assistant and 1 secretary.
    4. Directors – arts, music, commercial subjects, physical education, recreation, manual training and Binet.
    5. 7 supervisors; 15 assistant supervisors.
    6. Under head of Child Guidance Department (Bruce B. Robinson) are 4 psychologists, 13 visiting teachers and 5 office assistants.
    7. 1 librarian, 2 moving picture operators, and an editorial assistant.
    8. Arts High School housed in the building of the Newark Public School of Fine and Industrial Arts.
    9. Weequahic High School erected.
    10. Complete junior high school established at Cleveland School to meet state requirements. 9th grade classes went into Ivy Street School & McKinley.
  • 1933 – September, Weequahic High School, McKinley Junior High School, Belmont Ave School closed as of June 30.
  • 1933 – Sept., Nutrition Classes abolished. Summit Home for Undernourished Children opened.
  • 1935 – Ivy Street Junior High School, April 12, Oath of Allegiance.
  • 1935 – Feb. 1, School for Blind transferred to Newton St. School.
  • 1936 – Statistics
    • 6 high school buildings.
    • School of Fine and Industrial Arts (Houses Arts High School).
    • 52 Elementary Schools.
    • Open-air school (Boylan).
    • School for crippled children (Branch Brook).
    • 2 Binet schools.
    • 2 ungraded school.
    • School for deaf (Bruce Street).
    • Approximately 2,500 teachers.
    • Barringer Evening High School (accredited) has an enrollment of 1,250.
  • 1937 – Stanley H. Rolfe succeeds John H. Logan as superintendent.
  • 1938 – June, Summit Home for Undernourished Children closed.
  • 1942 – Wartime summer program of nursery schools begins (July 5 – August 28, 2 shift hours from 7 am – 5 PM) in 5 schools with 20 teachers and 1 supervisor.
  • 1943 – Three more schools added childcare centers making total of 9. Dr. John S. Herron succeeds Rolfe as superintendent.
  • 1945 – Eight childcare centers under Board of Education control; 2 under Welfare Federation. November 1, Field Administrators at School Stadium $500 (10 Months).
  • 1945 – Feb., Sabbatical Furlough cut to half year.
  • 1946 – 10 childcare centers under Board control from March 1 – June 30. September three were carried on. Field Administrator at School Stadium $750.
  • 1947 – Accredited Evening High School transferred from Barringer building to Central High School building. Sept. l, Sabbatical Furlough restored to one year.
  • 1948 – Webster Elementary School as a junior high school by State Department of Education. Feb. 1, Weequahic Park Classes.
  • 1948 – March, Cerebral Palsy Clinic. July 1, Recreation Department reorganized.
  • 1949 – …appointment by the Superintendent of committees of teachers to select textbooks and educational supplies…Textbook Council.
  • 1950 – School at State Street became AudioVisual Materials Center.
  • 1950 – New Dayton Street School erected.
  • 1953 – Edward F. Kennelly becomes superintendent.
  • 1955 – Art Department located at State Street School; 2nd floor. Ivy Elementary School becomes a junior high. Sussex Avenue School – addition completed.
  • 1956 – Broadway Junior High School opened; elementary school in same building.
  • 1957 – Clinton Place Junior High School opened.
  • 1959 – West Kinney Junior High School opened January 5, replacing Cleveland, which became an elementary school.
  • 1961 – Seventh Avenue Junior High School opened, replacing Robert Treat, which became an elementary school. Ivy became a senior high school; re-named Vailsburg.
  • 1962 – Work begun on “new” Barringer High School; completed in September, 1964.
  • 1962 – Franklin Titus succeeds Kennelly as Superintendent.
  • 1963 – Quitman Street School opened; replacing Monmouth Street School.
  • 1963 – South 8th Street – 90% rebuilt at cost of $3,000,000.
  • 1963 – Dedication of Miller Street School’s new addition.
  • 1963 – Dedication of Peshine Avenue School’s new addition.
  • 1964 – Education Center for Youth established (one of the first alternative high schools in nation).
  • 1965 – The African Free School funded by Tittle I, was established on 3rd floor of Robert Treat School, by Le Roi Jones.
  • 1965 – 20 Headstart Centers established.
  • 1965 – Follow Through Program begins at Quitman and Morton Street Schools.
  • 1968 – Camden Street School (new building) opened.
  • 1969 – Springfield Avenue Community School at 18th and Springfield Avenues established.
  • 1969 – “School within a School” established at South Side High School – concept developed by Seymour Spiegel, South Side High School teacher, who serviced as school’s director until 1976. Unique features (1) entrance examination; (2) academic curriculum and (3) 11-month school year.
  • 1970 – African Free School incorporated into school system.
  • 1971 – 13th Avenue School opened – 72 classrooms can accommodate 1800 students – Pre-k to 8.
  • 1972 – Dr. Edward I. Pfeffer became acting superintendent. Central Avenue School destroyed by fire.
  • 1973 – Camden Middle School opened.
  • 1973 – Stanley Taylor became superintendent.
  • 1973 – Ground breaking ceremonies for new addition at Malcolm X Shabazz (formerly South Side).
  • 1974 – Board of Education moved to 2 Cedar Street
  • 1976 – July 1st, Stanley Taylor appointed the City’s first Executive Superintendent of Schools (a state created position) for a 3-year term.
  • 1977 – Charlton Street School closed.
  • 1977 – Waverly Avenue School closed.
  • 1977 – Central Evening School moved to West Side High School (9/77).
  • 1977 – June 23rd Stanley Taylor removed, Alonzo Kittrels appointed acting superintendent.
  • 1977 – “School within a School” moved from Malcolm X Shabazz (9/77) to 240 High School.
  • 1977 – University High School (formerly SWAS) officially dedicated Nov. 18, 1977.
  • 1977 – Louise A. Spencer School completed – 61 classrooms can accommodate 1,350 students – Pre-K to 8; replaced Charlton Street School.
  • 1978 – January, Alonzo Kittrels officially named to post of Executive Superintendent.
  • 1979 – Elementary School complete – 62 classrooms can accommodate 1,700; Pre-K to 8; also classes for auditorial handicapped (Bruce St. School) Continuing Education Program (C.E.P.) school for pregnant girls housed in Chestnut Street School. This program began at West Side High School and was held in the evening.
  • 1981 – Interim Superintendent Catherine Murphy.
  • 1981 – Dr. Columbus Salley replaced Alonzo Kittrels as superintendent.
  • 1981 – Clinton Place Junior High School closed (4/81).
  • 1981 – University High relocated to Clinton Place, fall 1981.
  • 1981 – Marcus Garvey (formerly Robert Treat School) closed.
  • 1981 – Education Center for Youth relocated to Marcus Garvey School (9/81).
  • 1981 – Truancy Task Force initiated – located at Marcus Garvey School (2/81).
  • 1981 – Columbus Salley appointed Executive Superintendent of Schools (9/81).
  • 1983 – Election held for first time to elect board members.
  • 1984 – West Kinney Jr. High closed (9/84).
  • 1984 – Following schools closed – Bergen, Mt. Pleasant, 15th Avenue and Roseville Avenue.
  • 1984 – E. Alma Flagg School on 3rd Street opened.
  • 1984 – Harold Wilson School (for special education students) opened on Muhammad Ali Blvd.
  • 1984 – Dr. Columbus Salley suspended June 1984.
  • 1984 – Dr. Gene A. Foti, Acting Superintendent – July 1984 to January 1985.
  • 1985 – West Kinney reopens as an alternative high school.
  • 1985 – Education Center for Youth moved to West Kinney.
  • 1985 – Marcus Garvey School reopens.
  • 1985 – Dr. Columbus Salley agrees to resign.
  • 1985 – January, Eugene C. Campbell became Executive Superintendent.
  • 1988-89 – Vailsburg High School closed – students go to West Side High School.
  • 1988-89 – Vailsburg Middle School created.
  • 1988-89 – Roseville Avenue School reopened.
  • 1990 – June, 2 Cedar Street renovated moved to 8, 9 & 10th floors.
  • 1990 – September, Arlington Avenue became a regular school.
  • 1990 – Marcus Garvey became High School Redirection.
  • 1991 – September, Broadway Middle changed to Luis Munoz Marin Middle.
  • 1991 – September, Harold Wilson became Harold Wilson Professional Development School.
  • 1992 – July, Board takes over COED from State.
  • 1992 – Floyd Paterson closed, June.
  • 1993 – Chestnut Street School closed.
  • 1993 – March 24, Bergen Street School changed to William H. Brown Academy.
  • 1994 – September, Board initiates “Reform” plan.
  • 1994 – Mt. Pleasant Annex Closed.
  • 1994 – NorthWard School opened (Rafael Hernandez School).
  • 1994 – December, Major Repairs to schools – cost $16,869,047.90 (109 projects).
  • 1995 – January, named official Rafael Hernandez Elementary School.
  • 1995 – Arlington Avenue became Alternative School.
  • 1995 – April 13 – Administrative Law Judge Stephen G. Weiss recommends that the New Jersey Department of Education issue an order to remove the School District’s Board, create a state operated school district; and take such other steps pursuant to law as are necessary to implement the same. Board of Education plans to exercise the right to appeal this decision.
  • 1995 – May 19 – Education Commissioner Leo Klagholz recommends an immediate takeover of the Newark school district.
  • 1995 – June 30 – Newark school district speaks out against takeover at the NAACP’s press conference.
  • 1995 – July 5 – State Board of Education accepts the commissioner’s decision to take over the Newark school district. Takeover is immediately effective.
  • 1995 – July 7 – Lawyers for the Newark school district appealed a state takeover to the state Supreme Court, blocking the move until Wednesday, July 12, 1995.
  • 1995 – July 12 – State Department of Education officials seized control of Newark’s public schools after the state Supreme Court refused to halt the state takeover. (The board will be allowed to argue the merits of its case more fully at a hearing next week.)
  • 1995 – The state fired the Executive Superintendent and top officials.
  • 1995 – The district became the third state-operated school system in New Jersey.
  • 1995 – July 17 – Dr. Beverly Hall begins her duties as State-Appointed District Superintendent for the Newark Public Schools.
  • 1995 – September 11 – Schools opened for the new school year with major repairs and renovations. (Outside vendors were hired and the community was asked to help spruce up for the start of school.)
  • 1995 – October 4 – Pope John visited Newark’s Sacred Heart Cathedral. There was an overwhelming amount of joy. No schools were closed, the event went well.
  • 1995 – October 16 – Million Man March – Many students, staff stayed home/or went to the event in Washington, D.C.
  • 1996 – January 2 – Arts High School students returned to their newly constructed building. Newly renovated state-of-the-arty facility.
  • 1996 – All-Day Kindergarten in place.
  • 1997 – Newark school district hosts first Principal for A Day program.
  • 1997 – The first Health & Dental Clinic opens at George Washington Carver.
  • 1998 – Redirection High School closed, students sent to West Kinney School.
  • 1998 – May, The New Jersey State Supreme Court accepted & endorsed a plan for achieving equity and parity for school children in the state’s Special needs Districts. The ruling constitutes the basis for Whole School Reform in New Jersey and in the Newark Public Schools.
  • 1998 – Maple Avenue playground renovated with Trust for Public Land
  • 1999 – Gladys Hillman-Jones Middle School opens in February ’99.
  • 1999 – Dr. Klagholz, Commissioner of Education, resigns, and effective: 4/5/99.
  • 1999 – Banneker Science Center officially opens on Lyons Avenue.
  • 1999 – New Commissioner of Education, David Hespe.
  • 1999 – May 19 – Ann Street School Selected as a National Blue Ribbon School.
  • 1999 – Two New Health & Dental Clinics Open – Quitman & Dayton St. Schools.
  • 1999 – June 18 – Dr. Beverly L. Hall leaves the Newark Public Schools for Atlanta, Georgia. Mrs. Beatrice Collymore departs on July 21, 1999.
  • 1999 – July 21 – Ms. Marion Bolden appointed State District Superintendent and Anzella Nelms, Deputy Superintendent of Educational Services.
  • 1999 – Gateway Academy Program opens for juvenile offenders.
  • 1999 – December – 12 High Schools, 1 Evening High, 53 Elementary.
  • 1999 – Schools (5 special schools) 1 State School – 77 Schools.
  • 2000 – May 9 – Ground breaking for new Shabazz High School’s $12 million athletic complex.
  • 2000 – July – Superintendent purchases old NJ Historical Society Building for new student center.
  • 2001 – January 31 – New Health Clinic Opens at Shabazz High School.
  • 2001 – School Building Project Advance as Overall Plan is approved.
  • 2001 – March – New Commissioner of Education – Vito A. Gagliardi.
  • 2001 – October 6 – Malcolm X Shabazz Athletic Field Opens – (State-of-the-art athletic stadium).
  • 2002 – January – William L. Librera appointed new Commissioner of Education.
  • 2002 – April – Aerospace Program grand opening & New Belmont-Runyon Groundbreaking.
  • 2003 – April – Marion A. Bolden reappointed NPS Superintendent.
  • 2003 – June – McKinley School opens new playground.
  • 2003 – August – Newly restored Civil Ward battle flag returns to the Newark School system (Barringer High school).
  • 2003 – November – Barringer High School Health Clinic opens.
  • 2003 – *Louise A. Spencer, Quitman Street & Brown Academy open new playgrounds between 1999 & 2003.
  • 2004 – May 17, groundbreaking for Science Park High School.
  • 2004 – June 15, Groundbreaking for the Central High School.
  • 2004 – September 9, The New Belmont Runyon Schools opens.
  • 2004 – Dec 1, MIC IT UP opens @ Harold Wilson School.
  • 2005 – June 21, NPS 1st parade.
  • 2005 – September – Harold Wilson School closed.
  • 2005 – October – Groundbreaking for New First Avenue Elementary school.
  • 2006 – June – Clinton Avenue & Warren Street Schools close.
  • 2006 – Clinton students to go to Avon & Belmont Runyon.
  • 2006 – Gladys Hillman-Jones no longer a middle school will become Barringer’s 9th Grade Academy.
  • 2006 – July – Cory Booker sworn in as Mayor of the City of Newark.
  • 2006 – Lucille E. Davy, appointed Commissioner of Education.
  • 2006 – NPS receives $5 million from the City of Newark for Untermann Field Renovations.
  • 2006 – A portion of the $63.7 million financing from the City of Newark (Capital Project Control Board).
  • 2006 – July 21 – Elliott Street School strike by lightning causes fire that heavily damaged the school.
  • 2006 – September 7 – Elliott School opens @ former Good Counsel School and St. Anthony’s in Belleville.
  • 2006 – November 20 – Science Park High School, 260 Norfolk Street, grand opening.
  • 2006 – Warren Street Schools closes.
  • 2006 – American History High Schools opens @ former Warren St School.
  • 2007 – September – Morton Street School (closes) students move to Cleveland/18th Ave/Quitman schools.
  • 2007 – West Side 9th Grade Success Academy moves to former Morton Street School.
  • 2007 – Vailsburg Middle (closes) students move to former Mt. Vernon Annex, 746 Sanford Avenue.
  • 2007 – Vailsburg Middle site opens as Ivy Hill Elementary School.
  • 2007 – New First Avenue School, 214 First Avenue opens.
  • 2007 – The old First Avenue School will be known as Elliot Street Annex (1 of 3 sites, since the school burned down).
  • 2007 – Newly renovated Untermann Field hosted first football game of the season.
  • 2007 – November 20, groundbreaking on the new Speedway Elementary School.
  • 2007 – November 30, groundbreaking on new Park elementary school (Verona & Manchester Place).
  • 2008 – May 30, Grand Opening of the Student Center, 230 Broadway – Named the Marion A. Bolden Student Center.
  • 2008 – June 25 – Groundbreaking for the New stadium in the North Ward and groundbreaking for the new Weequahic Gym.
  • 2008 – June 27 – Groundbreaking for the new Robotics Center (site of the old Chestnut Street School).
  • 2008 – June 30 – Dr. Bolden steps down as the State District Superintendent.
  • 2008 – July 1 – Dr. Kevin West, appointed as the Acting State District Superintendent.
  • 2008 – August 15 – New Superintendent Dr. Clifford B. Janey arrives.
  • 2008 – August 28 – Uniform Initiative will be implemented effective 12/1/08.
  • 2008 – September 4, Dr. Janey host 1st district convocation at Prudential Center.
  • 2008 – September 8 – Ribbon cutting for new Central High School.
  • 2008 – September 10 – Special Education Command center implemented.
  • 2008 – October 6 – Newton Street school new playground ribbon cutting.
  • 2008 – October 7 – Mt. Vernon school new playground ribbon cutting.
  • 2009 – May 15 – Central High school ribbing cutting for Delta Dental Careers Center.
  • 2009 – June 12 – University High School of the Humanities Thurgood Marshall Law Academy Courtroom, ribbon-cutting.
  • 2009 – June 30 – close Vailsburg Middle School & William Brown Academy.
  • 2009 – (new construction: West Side High, Schools Stadium, Oliver Street & South Street).
  • 2009 – September 3 – Opening of the new Park Elementary School.
  • 2010 – Speedway Elementary School opens on So. Orange Ave. Old Speedway converted to Early Childhood School West.