English Division

High School Courses

BARD001  English 9: Literature of the Americas I

BARD002  English 9: Literature of the Americas II

This two-semester sequence, organized by genre, covers essays, poetry, classic novels, dramas and short stories from the Americas.  Students learn how to construct thesis-centered analytical essays in response to a variety of literary genres.  In so doing, they learn how to present and interpret quotes, and to articulate the larger significance of the quotes to the text; how to organize their ideas in a clear, logical and coherent sequence; and how to revise and edit their essays in order to clarify and deepen their arguments and ideas, and to do so in appropriate style, diction, and voice.  Students will learn how to generate deeper and more complex responses to texts by engaging in a variety of informal writing routines and seminar-style discussions.

BARD003  English 10: World Literature I

BARD004  English 10: World Literature II

This two-semester sequence, organized regionally, covers essays, poetry, classic novels, dramas and short stories from Europe, China and its East Asian environs, regions within Africa, and other selected areas.  Students build on their work from English 9, by constructing thesis-centered analytical essays in response to a variety of literary genres, while reflecting regional divergences and confluences.  Students expand their skills in presenting and interpret quotes, and to articulate the larger significance of the quotes to the text; organizing their ideas in a clear, logical and coherent sequence; and revising and editing their essays in order to clarify and deepen their arguments and ideas in appropriate style, diction, and voice.  Students will generate deeper and more complex responses to texts by engaging in a variety of informal writing routines and seminar-style discussions.

College Courses

BARD013       College Topics in Literature: Reading and Writing Poetry

Students will explore poetry and poetics through many reading, writing, and performing assignments.  Close attention will be paid to learning from our own work, learning from the work of our colleagues, and learning from the work of published poets. Readings will include the work of contemporary and traditional poets, especially as tools for increasing our understanding of the study, as well as the craft, of poetry. Assignments will include analytical responses to poetry, portfolios of our own work, responses to the work of our peers, and reflections on the art making process. No experience in writing poetry is required. Introduction to Creative Writing is recommended.

 BARD013       Introduction to Creative Writing: Short Fiction

This course is an introduction to writing short fiction. We will consider fundamental elements of fiction and the relationship between narrative structure, style, and content, exploring these elements in students’ own work and in weekly assigned readings in order to develop an understanding of the range of possibilities open to the fiction writer. Weekly readings and writing exercises are designed to encourage students to explore the material and styles that most interest them, and to push their fiction to a new level of craft, so that over the semester their writing becomes more clear, controlled, and absorbing. Additionally, students will have individual conferences with the instructor to discuss their progress and interests. Half of our class time will be spent discussing student work and half will be spent discussing syllabus readings.

BARD013       College Topics in Literature: Shakespeare

This course will give students the necessary tools to examine, enjoy and appreciate the poetry and plays of Shakespeare. We will consider his plays as both texts and as works intended for performance. Our readings will include plays that are representative of the different genres Shakespeare practiced, comedy, tragedy, romance, and history. We may, therefore, examine together such plays as A Midsummer Night’s Dream, King Lear, The Winter’s Tale and Henry V. This course will provide students with the foundation for future explorations of Shakespeare’s works.

BARD013       College Topics in Literature: Major Authors: James Baldwin and Maya Angelou

In this course, we will explore a selection of work by two major American writers of the 20th century: James Baldwin and Maya Angelou. Both were of African descent and both were born in the 1920’s. James Baldwin and Maya Angelou were actually good friends. Their life experiences are intricately tied to their writings which address issues such as race, racism, segregation, whiteness, civil rights, activism, abuse, survival and the quest for acceptance, unity, and equality. These are all issues that continue to resonate with 21st America. By reading nonfiction essays, poems, short stories, a novel, and an autobiography, we will explore both writers’ perspectives on America’s history and struggles as well as their hopes for the future.  The larger intent of the course is to move beyond an awareness of their creative & critical contributions. One of our “big questions” will be: to what extent are the ideas and messages of Maya Angelou & James Baldwin relevant & useful today?